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May 2018

On the 20th anniversary of his death, his family celebrates his life and his life's work. more

People & Life

Father and son glassblowers Leon and Eli Applebaum transform nature into transparent art. more

Arts & Leisure

No fast skating, but lots of community involvement in Tioga. more

Arts & Leisure

A family's roots run deep in a new Burdett restaurant. more

People & Life

Corning Inc. celebrates 150 with an epic Erie Canal birthday barge. more

Arts & Leisure

Cooking up a storm with the fabulous Beekman boys. more

Food & Drink

Professor Wayne Higby's ceramic art lands at Smithsonian's Corning affiliate. more

Arts & Leisure

Pancakes...food plot...cover crop...what's not to plant? more

Food & Drink

Karon Swendrowski cultivates her husband's legacy at Oregon Hill Winery. more

People & Life

Derek James, never-say-never local driver, makes good at the races. more

People & Life

Amber Waves of Grain

In the aftermaths of September 11, 2001, Gary Cronk, of Penn Yan, says he and his wife, Darlene “felt like everyone else—dumbfounded, hurt.” They wanted to show their support for families, for the country. It was odd for those few days after the attack when there were no planes in the sky, but, knowing flights would resume again at some point, the couple wanted to make a sign big enough for pilots and passengers at 30,000 feet to see it. “We’re proud that we accomplished this,” Gary says of the field of winter wheat in shapes of the letters USA, each the size of a football field, which can also be seen from Route 54A. The Cronks maintained the field for about ten years, and have since sold the property. The new owners, father and son team Greg and Jeffrey MacDonald, are maintaining the letters in grass. ~ Gayle Morrow