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Linda Roller

With new owners, the Otto Bookstore begins its next chapter. more

Arts & Leisure

Williamsport’s favorite ice cream keeps on churning. more

People & Life

For years, a herd of happy grazers has called the Wayne Township Landfill home. more

Outdoors

With a series of young adult novels, author Paul Nelson helps readers see through his son's eyes. more

People & Life

Veterinarian Amanda Paulhamus rolls in her mobile office/lab. more

People & Life

There's nothing like trapping summer in a jar. more

Food & Drink

Alison Bechdel’s memoir returns home to Clinton County and the stage at Millbrook Playhouse. more

Arts & Leisure

Faced with declining prices, auctioneers turn to the Internet to bring more buyers to the floor. more

People & Life

The Williamsport Symphony Orchestra celebrates its fiftieth with a season of reunions. more

Arts & Leisure

A South Williamsport funeral home joins a Slabtown carriage company for timeless endings. more

People & Life

Joanne Landis and her work grace the Community Arts Center. more

People & Life

Williamsport's Marching Millionaires host the 2016 Drum Corps Invitational. more

Arts & Leisure

Lock Haven's Piper Aviation Museum is the legacy of a "can-do" spirit. more

People & Life

On Route 80, Kavkaz Restaurant serves up the flavors of the Motherland. more

Food & Drink

And giving thanks for the eternal season of giving. more

People & Life 1 Comments

On the shores of Rose Valley Lake, you’re invited to do just that. more

Outdoors

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Elizabeth Bowman

Unable to get her horse shod, Lindsey Waltz forged a life as a farrier. more

Outdoors

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Sarah Wagaman

Flat track roller derby heads for our hills. more

People & Life

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Cindy Davis Meixel

Robert M. Sides Family Music Centers center on service. more

Arts & Leisure

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Courtesy of Bradford County Heritage Village and Farm Museum

Set in fertile soil, the Bradford County Heritage Village and Farm Museum flourishes. more

Outdoors

Amber Waves of Grain

In the aftermaths of September 11, 2001, Gary Cronk, of Penn Yan, says he and his wife, Darlene “felt like everyone else—dumbfounded, hurt.” They wanted to show their support for families, for the country. It was odd for those few days after the attack when there were no planes in the sky, but, knowing flights would resume again at some point, the couple wanted to make a sign big enough for pilots and passengers at 30,000 feet to see it. “We’re proud that we accomplished this,” Gary says of the field of winter wheat in shapes of the letters USA, each the size of a football field, which can also be seen from Route 54A. The Cronks maintained the field for about ten years, and have since sold the property. The new owners, father and son team Greg and Jeffrey MacDonald, are maintaining the letters in grass. ~ Gayle Morrow